Land Rights publications

Land Rights in Africa publications from various sources

  • February 2022

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  • Gregory Myers and Jolyne Sanjak

The reality that significant improvements in security of tenure at scale in rural Africa are still needed nearly a decade after the adoption of the Voluntary Guidelines for the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests (VGGT) suggests a need to explore its limitations and consider what it would take to realize its objectives. The article documents significant impacts of the VGGT reform processes and highlights illustrative or “one-off” results.

  • January 2022

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  • Sam Lwanga Lunyiigo

The land crises and large-scale land grabs affecting many African countries today stem from historical and colonial mistakes whose problems remain. The systems, policies and laws that are being pushed to “register” and “formalise” land ownership do not put into consideration the cultural and historical aspects that govern land in many countries on the continent. Professor Sam Lwanga Lunyiigo asks pertinent questions about this push and about implications of customary land registration in Uganda.

  • December 2021

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  • UNHABITAT, GLTN, UNHCR, NRC

The Key Messages on Sustaining Peace through Women’s Empowerment and Increased Access to Land and Property Rights in Fragile and Conflict-affected Contexts were intended to provide a reference on how to empower women and protect their housing, land and property rights in fragile and crisis affected contexts, and to set out why this is an essential element to sustain peace and stability. The publication includes a list of resources to further inform the development of related programmes and projects.

  • December 2021

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  • Mabinty M. Kamara (Politico SL)

Women in the districts of Bombali and Pujehun, affected by the large-scale land acquisition by multilateral companies, have called on the government to ensure inclusiveness in decision-making and good governance of their lands. They argue that most decisions relating to land in Sierra Leone are not inclusive of women, hence any family that does not have a male child stands to forfeit their lands. A local MP noted that 75 percent of the lands in the Sahn Malen chiefdom are owned by the company with title for 75 years.

  • December 2021

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  • Lorenzo Cotula (Land Portal blog)

In many parts of the world large-scale projects such as agribusiness plantations, mines and infrastructure have heightened the policy imperative to recognise the rights of socially, politically and juridically marginalised people – from small-scale farmers to forest dwellers, pastoralists, artisanal fishers and people living in informal settlements, including many who identify as Indigenous Peoples. Yet effective responses to land justice issues often require not just securing certain precarious rights, but also addressing imbalances between the rights and obligations of different groups. Includes between extraction and stewardship, the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure, bundles of rights and obligations, from concepts to context.

  • December 2021

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  • Africa-EU Partnership 2021 (Our Land is Our Life: Policy Brief)

Includes overview, the problem: Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) finance a destructive model, current situation: DFIs write off loans, impacted communities face repression, human rights abuses, the role of European DFIs, recommendations. The negative outcomes experienced in the case of Feronia Inc. continue to be repeated across Africa, including allegations of severe human rights violations, dispossession of community land, environmental destruction, and pollution, inducing conflict within local communities, creating dependency on insecure and underpaid jobs, whilst undermining food sovereignty, self-determination, and community resilience.

  • December 2021

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  • Africa-EU Partnership 2021 (Our Land is Our Life: Policy Brief)

Includes history of the project, the scale down, the role of European DFIs (Development Finance Institutions), recommendations. The issues of concern and damages often expressed by a critical mass of the Addax project communities have been confirmed. The communities were taken by surprise when the project was first scaled down and then sold twice. The DFIs have failed to provide timely information on obvious risks of failure and to act accordingly. All this created harm that could have been avoided. In the end, communities did not have access to justice.

  • December 2021

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  • Africa-EU Partnership 2021 (Our Land is Our Life: Policy Brief)

Includes Socfin in Sahn Malen, Pujehun District, lack of free, prior and informed consent, inadequate compensation for loss of land and crops, failure to mark boundaries of family land before clearing the land, indecent labour conditions, root causes of the Malen issues, recommendations.

  • December 2021

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  • Lorenzo Cotula (Land Portal blog)

Includes the literature rush, a longer-term perspective, contingent outcomes and flawed models, the place of legal research and action. Analytical work can help identify entry points to support governments and activists in reconfiguring public policies, such as on land governance, foreign investment and rural development. It can help consolidate systems for continued monitoring, shift more spotlight onto researchers and practitioners in the global South and strengthen alliances and shared learning spaces that cross national boundaries.

  • November 2021

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  • Cartoon Movement

This comic is based on field research conducted around the Feronia palm oil plantation in Tshopo province in north-east DR Congo as part of a project on ‘environmental defenders and atmospheres of violence’. The story focuses on people living next to the Feronia concession and how they experience and fight against the company. While the names in the comic are fictional, the described events are based on testimonies gathered during field research. This includes accounts of repression and heavy-handed responses by the security services, which highlight the dangers faced by those defending their land, their livelihoods, and the environment.

  • November 2021

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  • Megan Huth (IIED guest blog)

Some communities that have successfully created by-laws and community land governance committees that meet the Land Rights Act’s requirements for women’s participation can now continue with the land documentation process in a more representative and inclusive way. When land management committees represent a wider cross-section of the community, they can significantly improve land and natural resource management. Women often know more about boundary lines, because they are the ones engaged in agroforestry activities such as growing food and collecting firewood.

  • November 2021

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  • UNECA

The 2021 Conference on Land Policy in Africa opened with a resounding call for African countries to develop pro-poor land policies and inclusive land tenure rights, particularly for women and youth. Anything related to land needs strong political will, people buy-in, and close collaboration. Climate change has raised the risk of deforestation and land degradation. In recent years, a surge in the purchase of African land by foreign companies and governments to grow food and other crops for export has also set alarm bells ringing on and off the continent.

  • October 2021

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  • Catholic News Service

Africa’s Catholic bishops have criticized the appropriation of land, natural resources and other economic assets by private companies and called on national governments to show greater concern for local community rights and needs. They said: ‘The impunity of corporate and elite capture of African land and natural resources and the damage this is doing to Africa’s food systems, to our environment, our soils, lands and water, our biodiversity, our nutrition and health is a major concern. Land grabs push people off the land, fuelling conflicts and provoking displacement.’ They expressed concern that land deals in 2021, covering more than 62 million acres, had been concluded ‘by private actors encouraged and financially supported by governments and public development banks.’ Such business ventures continued to reflect European perspectives because of ‘the legacy of colonialism and huge differentials of power and capacity.’

  • October 2021

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  • Thais Bessa (IIED guest blog)

Describes how inclusive technology, a gender-responsive documentation process and shifting gender norms are empowering women through secure land rights. Includes recognising women as landowners, leading by example, securing land, securing futures.

  • October 2021

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  • Ugandan Land Defenders

Offers a short history since thousands of Ugandans fled their homes back in 2011. A grim history with evictions continuing, a company becoming more powerful and continuing arrest of land defenders on trumped-up charges.

  • October 2021

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  • Youjin Chung and Marie Gagne

Writers have guest-edited an African Studies Review forum on Understanding Land Deals in Limbo in Africa which examines the contentious politics of incomplete land grabs in Senegal, Tanzania and Zambia. These studies show that even when land deals are cancelled, stalled, downsized, transferred to new owners, or stay dormant and speculative for many years, they can still produce far-reaching consequences that often go unnoticed. The complex interplay of land governance, local political dynamics and capital’s own contradictions can push land deals in different and unexpected directions. These inconclusive land deals can still severely limit people’s land access and livelihoods, perpetuate fear of dispossession, and intensify local conflicts. In some cases, they can lead to international arbitration processes between states and foreign investors which seldom serve the interests of rural communities.

  • September 2021

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  • Land Matrix

More than 10 years since the surge in large-scale land acquisitions in developing countries which followed the spike in agricultural commodity prices in the late 2000s, the Land Matrix Initiative has taken stock of the global land rush and its socio-economic and environmental impacts. The findings are sobering, in part alarming. Compliance with the principles of responsible business conduct is rare, and scant consultation with the affected communities is common. The non-consensual and uncompensated loss of land often comes with only little socio-economic benefits – be they employment, positive productivity spill overs, or infrastructure. Business as usual continues to destroy rainforests, natural habitats, and biodiversity on the agricultural frontiers of the Amazon, Southeast Asia, and the Congo Basin. Although progress has been made with regard to land governance, a lack of policy implementation in this area is evident.

  • September 2021

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  • Namati

An 11 minute film illustrating how rural villagers in Sierra Leone are seeking to ensure justice. When a Chinese rubber company seized their forest and land they came together, used the law and won. Since then they have taken part in a fight to transform Sierra Leone’s systems for land and environmental governance.

  • September 2021

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  • Ugandan land defenders

In Uganda land remains the most sought–after natural resource, but legal and structural mechanisms have not been effective in addressing illegal land evictions faced by vulnerable communities. Most local investors have taken advantage of the structural gaps in land administration which have exacerbated the issuance of multiple titles. This has been compounded by Uganda’s weak justice system and excesses perpetrated by some police officers and the military. In recent times Uganda has witnessed catastrophic forced evictions across the country. These are connected to gross human rights violence. One company evicted more than 35,000 smallholder farmers.

  • September 2021

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  • Joy Imbuye (Land Portal blog)

Reviews some of the good practices as well as the challenges faced in advancing women’s land rights in select countries in Francophone Africa, focussing on issues related to inheritance rights for women and girls and women’s participation in land-related decision-making and governance. Essential to point out that in countries such as Senegal, where a majority of the population is Muslim, religion has a greater impact than statutory laws, so the Senegalese Family Code is very much neglected in rural areas. A similar story in Burkina Faso and Benin. Need for civil society organizations to build and broaden alliances and work closely with the national and local authorities to enhance women’s land rights in practice as well as in law.

  • September 2021

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  • World Rainforest Movement (WRM)

Includes an interview with Amanda Massaquoi, member of the Informal Alliance Against Industrial Oil Palm Plantations in West and Central Africa, who is supporting women in Sierra Leone who are opposing the oil palm plantations model. In practice women are not included in decision-making on land and there is a prevalent violence towards women from within communities. Attempts to synchronize all land laws have not been successful.

  • September 2021

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  • Ugandan land defenders

With the pandemic striking higher in Uganda, poor families continue to be forced off their land by their government and investors despite several directives halting evictions during the COVID period. Cites a number of examples. In the latest looming evictions, the Uganda government is evicting more than 35,000 artisanal miners in the Kisita mines in Kassanda district.

  • September 2021

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  • Zenebech Mesfin (IIED guest blog)

Describes the efforts of Zambian traditional leaders to promote gender equality in the management of land and natural resources at the national level. Developed a tool to address knowledge gaps and provide practical guidance on promoting gender equality in the chiefdoms in the areas of land, forestry, wildlife, water, fisheries, and minerals.

  • August 2021

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  • Allan Cain (Development Workshop Angola)

Traces the history of weak land tenure legislation and limited local government capacity in post-war Angola. Land conflict is an issue affecting urban, rural and peri-urban areas, with women the most vulnerable. There are large-scale land grabs by urban elites. Current government land and decentralization reforms provide an opportunity to design a strategy for protecting and improving women’s rights to land. Includes advocacy and public policy reform, co-production with communities and local government and recommendations. Believes there are increasing opportunities for civil society and community representatives to employ emerging local spaces to bring the debates on land rights into the public arena.

  • July 2021

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  • McKinley Charles (Namati)

Before the company’s arrival in 2011, the people of Ngovokpahun village had used their land to grow cocoa and other cash crops to help them pay for their children’s education. But when Italian Agriculture offered to build them a school, health centre and roads, provide them with employment and pay rent, leasing out the land seemed a wise option. The company drafted the agreement and the landowners signed. More than 5 years later, Italian Agriculture had not fulfilled a single promise. There was no school, health centre, roads or jobs. The company cultivated the land but rarely paid for it on time or in full. The landowners called Namati, Sierra Leone’s toll-free legal advice line. Its paralegals held a series of legal literacy sessions with all of Ngovokpahun’s youth and adults in attendance. At a second meeting the two parties agreed on a set of plans and targets for remedying the wrongs.

  • July 2021

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  • McKinley Charles (Namati)

The Maasai community of Musul have lived on the same land in Laikipia county for generations. It is their source of food and water, the heart of their culture and beliefs and their ancestral home. But until recently their legal rights to govern it were tenuous. Thousands of rural and Indigenous communities in Kenya are in the same position. This lack of clear legal rights puts them at high risk of being exploited by greedy investors and powerful officials or becoming embroiled in conflicts over land use. This historic injustice was finally righted for Musul in October 2020 when they received the deed to their community land. They are only the second community in Kenya to attain this legal recognition. They are continuing to advocate for the full implementation of the law throughout Kenya.

  • July 2021

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  • Patricia Malasha (IIED guest blog)

Describes how community-level dialogues uprooted harmful gender norms that hinder women’s rights to land. Showed that shifting harmful gender norms at the community level is crucial in supporting women to access land rights. Customary leaders like indunas and village headpersons are a key entry point for that shift. Change can be slow. But spaces for dialogue, critical reflection and support for action-planning enabled the indunas to not only change their own beliefs, but also begin to see their role and their communities in a different light.

  • July 2021

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  • Gabriela Bucher (Oxfam International) and Michael Taylor (International Land Coalition)

Land is a commodity like no other. We live on it, we grow from it, we drink from it and build our futures upon it. But we don’t share it equally. The distribution of land has long defined the gap between rich and poor. Now new data shows clearer than ever how the way in which land is being shared and managed profoundly impacts extreme and rising inequality and the achievement of women’s and girls’ rights. With the largest 1 percent of farms operating more than 70 percent of the world’s farmland, it is time that we called out the problem of extreme land inequality and committed to ending it.

  • July 2021

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  • IIED Briefing (Philippine Sutz)

For the past few decades, efforts to strengthen women’s land rights in many sub-Saharan African countries have primarily focused on a single approach: systematic registration through individual/joint certification or titling. While registration – individually or with a spouse – may support tenure security in specific contexts, the sheer complexity of land governance practices and tenure arrangements across the continent (both formal and customary) often render an emphasis on systematic titling inadequate. Looks at why the dominant approach isn’t necessarily delivering change for women, reviews the multifaceted realities encompassed by the generic term ‘women’s land rights’. Suggests that governments and development actors adopt context-specific complementary strategies, able to react to local complexity, and deliver effective sustainable support for women seeking to secure land in sub-Saharan Africa.

  • June 2021

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  • Ben Cousins (PLAAS, University of the Western Cape)

In a landmark judgement a South African high court has declared that people living on customary land in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, notionally held in trust by the Ingonyama (king) of the Zulu people, are the “true and beneficial owners” of that land. It confirms that the Ingonyama Trust Board is not the real owner of this land. It therefore cannot convert the customary land rights of occupiers to rent-paying leases as it has been doing. The Trust is in fact only a notional owner of this land. It is mandated to administer the land “for the benefit, material welfare and social well-being” of members of the affected rural communities. It administers around 2.8 million hectares, amounting to about one third of the whole of the province. The court also found that the minister in charge of land reform has breached her duty to respect, protect and promote these informal land rights, as required by law. The judgement has massive implications for the government’s land reform programme. Often only the bravest of rural people are willing to stand up and make their voices heard as applicants and witnesses, as in this case. But their courage shows what is possible. In greater numbers, and applying more sustained pressure from below, ordinary South Africans can ensure that the state begins to deliver the promises enshrined in the Constitution.

  • June 2021

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  • UN Habitat

Presents a framework for tackling urban-rural land challenges. Designed to help a range of stakeholders in developing countries understand how to adopt an inclusive approach to land management and administration initiatives to produce a balance in urban and rural development. Provides structured guidance for addressing land-specific problems within the intersection of urban and rural development. Presents action-oriented steps and recommendations that should be pursued in urban-rural interdependent development. Hopes the publication will inspire additional policy debate on securing land tenure on an urban-rural continuum rather than viewing these areas in isolation.

  • July 2021

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  • Ali Kaba

The Land Rights Law, enacted on 23 August 2018, recognizes the land rights of all Liberians, especially rural communities who have historically been subject to mere user rights on their ancestral lands. So far 120 communities have been helped by civil society organizations to identify their respective customary lands, harmonize borders with neighbours and elect a land management team.
These claims cover at least 1.5 million hectares, or more than ten percent of the country. But none of them have been issued the promised customary title deeds. There are reports that chiefs and elders are offering customary land to national elites without the consent of the community, a violation of the law. Analyses some of the key problems – serious underfunding, over-centralization, unclear role of chiefs and elders. Offers some suggestions, failing which Liberia’s impressive land law could be used as a tool for elite land capture, resulting in a vicious circle of national and international land grabs.

  • April 2021

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  • Martin Adams

A review of a book on land in Kenya published in 2020 by Boydell and Brewer Ltd. The reviewer offers a detailed analysis and discussion of the 8 chapters of this 224-page book. The chapters are entitled: introduction: what we talk about when we talk about land; land reform in Kenya: the history of an idea; making mischief: land in modern Kenya; land and constitutional change; the new institutional framework for land governance; land governance before the Supreme Court; rethinking historical land injustices; taking justice seriously.

  • July 2021

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  • Abebaw Abebe Belay and Fiona Flintan (CGIAR)

The paper aims to understand what land rights women have under formal and customary legal systems in pastoral areas in Ethiopia, how these are implemented and what their impact is, and to make recommendations for their convergence. It focuses on two pastoral regions: Afar and Oromia national regional states. The research revealed that there is a high disparity between what the law says and what is being practiced on the ground as far as women’s land rights in pastoral areas are concerned. Recommends a promulgation/enactment of pastoral land administration laws and consideration of their acknowledgment and incorporation of customary and religious (informal) laws.

  • July 2021

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  • Lorenzo Cotula and Rachael Knight (FAO Legal Brief 2)

There is greater recognition that policies and projects should respect legitimate tenure rights. But this concept has often proved difficult to operationalise. Discusses the meaning and implications of recognising legitimate tenure rights, then outlines ways forward for States, civil society, the private sector, and development agencies.

  • July 2021

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  • Rachael Knight and Thierry Berger (FAO Legal Brief 3)

Law reform often involves political choices requiring public participation and consultation. Outlines how governments and civil society may promote participatory law-making, details the positive impacts of such processes, and makes various recommendations to ensure that all citizens’ voices are heard during law-making processes.

  • July 2021

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  • Rachael Knight (FAO Legal Brief 4)

Outlines how state and civil society-led legal empowerment initiatives can help secure land and resource rights, strengthen governance, improve access to legal systems and increase citizen participation in decision making.

  • July 2021

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  • Philippine Sutz, Emilie Beauchamp & Anna Bolin (IIED)

Report, through a cross-sectoral analysis of three recent case studies from sub-Saharan Africa, maps out the most effective tools and approaches for strengthening rural women’s voices in decision-making processes. The authors examine which are the key factors enabling or constraining rural women’s voices, what the main challenges are that practitioners should be aware of, and how projects can ensure rural women are able to participate in and influence decision making affecting their livelihoods.

  • May 2021

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  • Front Page Africa

A nationwide awareness campaign on the dissemination of information on the Land Rights Act (LRA) and the Liberia Land Authority Act (LLAA) has begun across Liberia with a focus on communication, the laws, women’s rights and community engagements. The communication aspect of the awareness campaign is focused on how the LLA can forge partnerships with the media to promulgate the LLA Act and the Land Rights Act; while the laws component of the awareness campaign seeks to provide an overview of the four categories of land rights as enshrined in the LRA, with emphasis on the key provisions of customary land rights, as well as the Liberia Land Authority mandate, functions, and institutional arrangements.

  • May 2021

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  • IIED (Aissata Hathie and Ibrahima Dia)

A recent study of two Senegalese villages showed how training women on land access is helping them claim their land rights. But disparities in results between locations and the use of customary practices as the preferred way of accessing land highlighted that civil society organisations’ strategies and approaches need to reflect local realities and ensure women from different groups and geographies also benefit.

  • May 2021

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  • IIED Briefing (Samuel Nguiffo and Amaelle Seigneret)

Responding to an invitation from the Cameroonian government to help design a new land legal framework, civil society stakeholders have issued multiple proposals over the years on the topics they think should be included in the new land law. The LandCam project has documented, analysed and consolidated these proposals. Building on these, the authors also developed a comprehensive and coherent vision for the new land system and have made concrete recommendations, cited in this Briefing, for Cameroonian policymakers.

  • May 2021

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  • Landesa (Beth Roberts)

Secure land tenure is key to eradicating poverty, increasing agricultural investment and ensuring food security, and is an essential element of climate action and climate resilience. Yet women have far weaker rights to land than men. These disadvantages exist broadly and with few exceptions globally and are especially limiting to the well-being of women and their families in rural areas, where land is the basis for livelihood, identity, social standing and social security. In USAID agricultural programming, this question becomes particularly relevant for fulfilling commitments to gender equality and for the success of programmes overall. This post provides an overview of the challenges to women’s secure land rights, why those challenges matter in the context of agriculture, and approaches USAID and its partners can employ to overcome them.

  • May 2021

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  • GRAIN

Companies in the business of selling farmland to billionaires and pension funds are peddling it as a green, sustainable and socially responsible investment. This propaganda is working. The digital land records and massive quantities of data that big tech companies like Microsoft and Amazon are vacuuming up from farmers’ fields make it easier for the companies to scour the planet for profitable farmland deals. They can also use satellite technologies and drones to monitor their farms from a distance. But the world’s farmland is finite. So, as corporations inhabit more of it, the less there is for small farmers, indigenous peoples and rural communities. Small farms have greater biodiversity and tree cover. They feed their communities with healthy foods. They generate and distribute wealth locally and fairly and build dynamic communities. They can and often do practice agroecology without fossil fuels or chemical inputs. Those who presently control the world’s financial flows are not capable of supporting the food producers and food systems that can deal with the climate crisis or the many other crises afflicting food and agriculture. Our challenge is to get both farmland and money out of their hands, as fast as we can.

  • May 2021

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  • Legal Assistance Centre (The Namibian)

The restitution of ancestral land rights in Namibia has  divided opinions since independence. Some argue it is a fitting process in dealing with colonial era land dispossessions, others are concerned about the complexity of implementing this kind of restitution. At independence, the Namibian government adopted the viewpoint of the latter group, arguing that the restitution of ancestral land rights is not possible because of historical complexities in establishing land occupancy by indigenous people at the time of Namibia’s colonisation. Subsequent policy and law on land reform therefore excluded the restitution of ancestral land rights; but the public debate on restitution remained alive among those mostly affected by historical land dispossessions. After a 2018 conference, President Geingob established a commission of inquiry into claims of ancestral land rights and restitution. Testimonies presented to the commission expressed deep-seated dissatisfaction, frustration and disillusionment. There were complaints about illegal fencing. The commission concluded that ancestral land has different meanings to different communities and in different contexts, and that the purpose of ancestral land restitution involves correcting the historical injustices of land dispossession. It recommends that the Namibian parliament should enact an ancestral land rights claim and restitution law within the next two years, on condition that this process and its outcome must be consistent with constitutional, international and human rights law.

  • May 2021

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  • The Ethiopian Herald

A Federal Ethiopian government official stated that lack of legal cadaster has caused maladministration from which the government is still suffering as it has resulted in illegal construction and non-legal documental land ownership, which have become sources of conflict in most parts of the nation. There is now a plan to raise public awareness about the legal cadaster system, which it will be implementing in towns and cities.

  • May 2021

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  • Cheryl Doss and Vanya Slavchevska (Land Portal)

Advancing women’s land rights is a priority for the international development agenda, yet there is no consensus on which rights should be monitored and reported. Three indicators of women’s property rights are widely used in the literature: each captures a different aspect of women’s land rights. Our recent academic paper explores the extent to which these different rights are held by the same person, using data from six African countries. The first is who owns the land, the second who manages the plot, the third who controls the use of the output. Quantitative evidence from six nationally representative surveys in Africa indicates that the gender gaps in land rights differ, depending on which indicator of land rights is used. They also vary widely across countries depending on whether we consider rights held by a single individual (sole rights) or those held jointly with others (usually a spouse). The quantitative evidence is clear. We should not treat these different rights as interchangeable in our analyses. The rights are frequently not held by the same person.

  • April 2021

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  • Regina Neudert and Lieske Voget-Kleschin

Proponents of large-scale agriculture have put forward a multitude of reasons to support the advancement of this approach to farming. Large-scale agriculture is seen as the only way to “modernise” and “develop” the land, to close the yield gap, and to ensure food availability. Furthermore, socio-economic outcomes are assumed to be higher under the management of large-scale farming operations than on small-scale farms. This study reviewed scientific literature on the microeconomic and social effects of large-scale land acquisitions in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  • April 2021

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  • Daily Nation

On 27 April 2021 President Kenyatta launched the National Land Information Management System (NLIMS), the culmination of years of digitisation of chaotic land records. It is expected to ease title transfers and safeguard public land from grabbers. It coincided with the opening of a National Geospatial Data Centre, an online depository that will contain all the land records in the country. The President said that ‘at the click of a button citizens will carry out various land transactions, drastically reducing human interaction, delays and all other inconveniences that Kenyans have had to endure in our land registries. Perennial fraud, corruption and illegal transactions will be a thing of the past.’

  • April 2021

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  • Amy Coughenour Betancourt CADASTA (Land Portal)

The CEO of Cadasta argues that since its founding in 2015, Cadasta has become the leading provider of technical tools and services to support the documentation of land and resource rights to build stronger, more sustainable communities. We have continued to adapt and improve our tools and strategy to make it easier than ever to collect, store, and analyse land and resource rights data around the world. We have now worked with more than 70 partners in 33 countries to advance the land and resource rights of over 5 million people across 11.8 million hectares in 1,580 communities. Over 100,000 land documents covering over 600,000 people have been issued by governments, and this number continues to grow. Cadasta’s dashboards, webmaps, and data analysis tools help put information and decisions in the hands of those who need it the most – families and communities left out of formal land systems who rely on their land for their livelihoods, their lives, and their futures.

  • March 2021

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  • CCSI and CED

Despite a recent transparency law and participation in transparency initiatives, Cameroon’s investment environment remains plagued by poor transparency. In a new report CCSI and CED find that: communities continue to be excluded from decision-making around investments; the government pursues a top-down approach to concession allocation and remains reluctant to recognize all legitimate tenure rights; it faces threats to its legitimacy as the grievances of citizens and investors alike lead to the barring of roads by communities and investor withdrawals; investors are aware of the challenges of current legislation and are also in favour of inclusive land reform. CCSI and CED call for: a new law and a national moratorium on any new approvals for large-scale agribusiness and other land-based investment projects until Cameroon’s legal and policy landscape has been reformed.