News

  • 4 May 2016

The Ethiopia WIDE team have published a second series of “Discussion Briefs,” written in 2015/16, which review evidence from longitudinal research of twenty rural communities in Ethiopia  related to a range of specific sectors or issues; and which are intended as resources for further deliberation about how to improve outcomes from Ethiopia’s model of transformation. The papers present and analyse patterns of evidence that recur across all or several of the 20 WIDE communities, focusing on policy considerations emerging from evidence that transcends anecdote.

The briefs and their authors are as follows:

  1. Introducing Ethiopia WIDE and its policy relevance, Sarah Vaughan
  2. Rurbanisation, urban expansion into rural areas, and thickening rural-urban linkages, Pip Bevan, reviewed by Tegegne Gebre Egziabher
  3. Differentiation and inequalities in rural communities, 2010-13, Alula Pankhurst with assistance from Theodros W Giorgis, reviewed by Dessalegn Rahmato
  4. Youth transitions to adulthood in rural communities, 2010-13, Alula Pankhurst with assistance from Nathan Nigussie, reviewed by Yisak Tafere
  5. Education in rural Ethiopia 2010-13: aspiration and uncertainty, Catherine Dom, reviewed by Setotaw Yimam
  6. Changing patterns in maternal and infant health and wellbeing in rural Ethiopia from 2003- 2013, Pip Bevan, reviewed by Helen Andemikael
  7. Economic participation of women and girls in rural Ethiopia, 2010-13, Lilli Loveday with Catherine Dom, reviewed by Emebet Mulugeta
  8. Moving for work from rural communities, 2010-2013, Catherine Dom, reviewed by Asnake Kefale
  9. Insights on economic success in rural Ethiopia, 2010-2013, Tefera Goshu with Catherine Dom, reviewed by Ezana Amdework
  10. Diffusion of knowledge, learning, “technology transfer” and change in rural communities, Sarah Vaughan, reviewed by Zerihun Mohammed.

View the papers on the Ethiopia WIDE website.

The authors (Pip Bevan, Catherine Dom, Tefera Goshu, Lilli Loveday, Alula Pankhurst and Sarah Vaughan) are grateful for the funding from the UK Department for International Development, Irish Aid and the Swedish International Development Agency that allowed them to prepare these briefs.

  • 15 April 2016

On Wednesday 13 April, Mokoro was visited by Professor Shirley Randell who gave a fascinating presentation on the impact of women’s political leadership on democracy and development in Rwanda. Over the last ten years, Shirley has worked extensively in Rwanda, including establishing the Centre for Gender, Culture and Development Studies at the Kigali Institute of Education, now the Centre for Gender at the University of Rwanda. Her presentation drew on a number of these graduates as well as highlighting findings from recent research undertaken for the Commonwealth on women’s political participation.

  • 23 March 2016

Mokoro is excited to announce Tanzania as the second pilot country for the WOLTS study – a multi-country strategic research project in support of women’s land rights. Principal Consultant, Elizabeth Daley, and Research Officer, Zoe Driscoll, have recently returned from an inception visit to Tanzania, where they held initial discussions with relevant government and civil society stakeholders working on pastoralist-, mining-, land- and gender-related issues.

Read more about WOLTS here.

  • 21 March 2016

Mokoro have launched the website of the Ethiopia WIDE project. WIDE is an ongoing longitudinal study of twenty rural communities in Ethiopia which began in 1994. Subsequent rounds of fieldwork were carried out in 2003 and in three stages between early 2010 and late 2013. The website is designed to be a publicly accessible repository for all the WIDE data, publications and workshop and conference presentations. More will be added to the website over the next few months.

The communities have been viewed as complex and open social systems on trajectories through time. The data has been made, interpreted and analysed using case-based techniques from sociology and social anthropology. We would like anyone who uses our data for publication to acknowledge the WIDE project, provide a link to the database, and send us a copy of the publication.

Visit the website here

  • 17 February 2016

The final report of the WFP Palestine Country Portfolio Evaluation (CPE) 2011-2015, led by Mokoro, has been published. The Mokoro team was led by Stephen Turner.

The country portfolio evaluation for the State of Palestine covered all WFP operations from 2011 to mid 2015, and the 2014–2016 country strategy. It assessed WFP’s alignment and strategic positioning, the factors and quality of its strategic decision-making, and the performance and the results of the portfolio activities as a whole.

The evaluation made seven recommendations, including redefining the focus of WFP’s food assistance on food security and protection of livelihoods; restructuring its portfolio design; providing technical advisory services to the Palestinian Authority’s school feeding and labour-intensive public works; developing staff profiles; refining the targeting of beneficiary households; developing monitoring and analytical systems; enhancing advocacy and resource mobilization for the Nutrition Awareness Campaign; and clarifying respective roles in the field of nutrition with other United Nations agencies in the State of Palestine.

The final report and summary report can be downloaded from the World Food Programme website.

  • 30 November 2015

Mokoro is pleased to announce Mongolia as the first pilot country for the WOLTS study – a multi-country strategic research project in support of women’s land rights. Principal Consultant, Elizabeth Daley, and Research Officer, Zoe Driscoll, have recently returned from an inception visit to Mongolia, where Mokoro is excited to be partnering with People Centered Conservation (PCC). PCC is a Mongolian NGO established in 2006, which has as its purpose to promote the protection of natural resources through support to the activities of local residents and civil society, with a strong commitment to addressing issues for gender equality and vulnerable groups. Read more about WOLTS here.

  • 13 November 2015

On Tuesday 10th November, Mokoro held a seminar on ‘New Research on Women’s Land Rights’. This seminar was a forum to discuss the findings of our speakers’ recent extended fieldwork, about the current status of women’s land rights in the places they have been studying. Helen Dancer talked about her fieldwork in Tanzania, researching women’s claims to land in the land tribunals of Arusha. Kristina Lanz spoke about her recent fieldwork in the Volta region of Ghana, looking at the impacts of large-scale land acquisitions on households. The seminar aimed to identify what their research could contribute to current debates on women’s land rights and to critical issues for action and lobbying in the context of Beijing+20 and the SDGs. The presentations can be found here.

  • 5 November 2015

The final report of the Joint Evaluation for the Renewed Effort Against Child Hunger and Under-nutrition (REACH) Initiative (2011-2015) has been published. The Evaluation Brief, the Full Evaluation Report, Summary Evaluation Report, and  other related  documents can be found on the WFP website and more information about Mokoro’s work leading the evaluation can be found here.

  • 4 November 2015

Mokoro is carrying out major multi-country strategic research in support of women’s land rights. The Women’s Land Tenure Security Project (WOLTS) has a 3-fold goal over the next 10 years to:

  1. Establish a stronger evidence base on the internal and external threats to women’s land tenure security in selected developing countries, especially in the context of large-scale land acquisitions (LSLAs);
  2. Strengthen the capacity of communities, NGOs/CSOs and local governments to protect and secure women’s land rights in the face of these threats, contributing to a paradigm shift that sees gender equality and women’s rights mainstreamed within community land management, land tenure governance and land rights protection efforts worldwide; and
  3. See tangible improvements in women’s land tenure security in the communities and countries reached by the project, and wider sharing and dissemination of the lessons learned and tools developed for a greater and more lasting impact.

WOLTS is a practical action-oriented research project and focuses initially on a study of pastoral communities under threat from mining investments and related LSLAs. Working with civil society partners, the study investigates the state of women’s land tenure security in selected communities through participatory fieldwork and identifies the main threats to women’s land rights. An ‘empowerment lens’ is used to assess possible means to secure women’s land rights from internal threats within communities, and to support communities as a whole to withstand external threats. From this, both generic and contextually-appropriate tools will be developed to increase the capacity of local people, partner organisations, and land tenure governance institutions and processes to respond to threats and contribute to tangible improvements in women’s land rights.

The research is led by Mokoro’s Principal Consultant, Dr. Elizabeth Daley, who is joined on the core team by Principal Consultant, Dr. Christopher Tanner, and Research Officer, Zoe Driscoll.

  • 2 November 2015

The final report of the WFP Tanzania Country Portfolio Evaluation (CPE) 2011-2014, led by Mokoro, has been published. The Mokoro team was led by Stephen Turner.

This Country Portfolio Evaluation assessed WFP’s alignment and strategic positioning; the factors and quality of its strategic decision-making; and the performance and the results of the portfolio. Portfolio performance was characterised by technical competence – strong work was done by dedicated staff – but strategic drift. Assistance to refugees was generally efficient and effective, and the P4P pilot made progress towards sustainable results. But the Country Strategy’s objective of “concentrated and integrated programmes and hunger solutions” was not achieved; nor was its ultimate objective of “handover to government and partners”.

The evaluation’s recommendations are based on the need for a fundamental reappraisal and justification of WFP’s role and comparative advantage in medium- and long-term food assistance, maintaining frontline emergency assistance to refugees and the provision of any supplementary feeding that no other agency is better equipped to supply.

The final report and summary report can be downloaded from the World Food Programme website.